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(2006)

Cannabis Doesn’t Cause Lung Cancer

 

Dr. Donald Tashkin, a prominent pulmonologist at  the University of California at Los Angeles, has spent over forty years  studying the effects of cannabis on the lungs. When some of his earliest  research established that the plant’s tar contains cancer-causing  chemicals as potentially harmful as tobacco, Tahskin perhaps  understandably jumped to the conclusion that smoking cannabis regularly  must significantly damage the lungs.

But in 2006, with funding from the National Institute on  Drug Abuse, he led the largest case-control study ever done on the  subject, and rather unexpectedly concluded that smoking cannabis—even  frequently and in large amounts—does not lead to lung cancer.

Those findings were “against our expectations,” according to Tashkin:

“We hypothesized that there would be a positive  association between marijuana use and lung cancer, and that the  association would be more positive with heavier use. What we found  instead was no association at all, and even a suggestion of some  protective effect.”
 

The study not only debunked a powerful anti-cannabis  talking point, it strongly indicated that the plant has powerful  medicinal properties.

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“We hypothesized that there would be a positive  association between marijuana use and lung cancer, and that the  association would be more positive with heavier use. What we found  instead was no association at all, and even a suggestion of some  protective effect.” 

Find out more